Fencing highlights D to B

You know you want more fencing pics…. a few more recent highlights from D to C  and C to B!

Luke

Luke

Tendai

Tendai

George

George

Artwell

Artwell

Team work

Team work

Garikai walking home on the other side

Garikai walking home on the other side

Garikai walking home on the other side

Garikai walking home on the other side

George and Ramius after a good day at the fence

George and Ramius after a good day at the fence

Fencing Part 6: D to C

Arrive at D, turn the corner and we are heading for C. Now we have to practice our downhill fencing skills.

 

 

Dogs at fencing D to C

Dogs at fencing D to C

 

D to C just before the decline

D to C just before the decline

 

 

George checking the fence

George checking the fence

A serious Garikai

A serious Garikai

 

Ramius nailing while the end of the fence is stretched strand by strand

Ramius nailing while the end of the fence is stretched strand by strand

 

Ramius up close

Ramius up close

 

George manually tensioning for Ramius

George manually tensioning for Ramius

 

Looking back on progress D to C

Looking back on progress D to C

Last pole before the decline

Last pole before the decline

George holding barbed wire strainer

George holding barbed wire strainer

Pulling the extra strainer between high and low poles

Pulling the extra strainer between high and low poles

The team tackles the high to low problem

The team tackles the high to low problem

 

Tightening the high strainer

Tightening the high strainer

Bottom support for the same pole

Bottom support for the same pole

 

More supplies arriving down the steep section

More supplies arriving down the steep section

Garikai

Garikai

A taste of things to come in C to B

A taste of things to come in C to B

And below the Hornbydale entry in the all Zimbabwe Adventure Fencing Competition 2015.

 

The C to B Adventure Fencing Challenge Competition

The C to B Adventure Fencing Challenge Competition

Fencing Part 4: Start Fencing – Section E to D

It has really arrived! The day we start putting up the 2.1m mesh fence supplied by Fence Secure of Msasa Harare and made in Zimbabwe (also termed Veld Fence or Bonox Fence).

I will post under the alphabetical boundary sections. We are starting from point E (close to the house) and heading off to D about 250m away to the east.

 

Ramius and Tendai on Day 1 of fencing

Ramius and Tendai on Day 1 of fencing

 

100m of fencing rolled out infant of the poles

100m of fencing rolled out in front of the poles

I’m sure there is a technical name for this device – ‘fence grabber’ will do for now!

Using our custom made fence grabber for the first time

Using our custom made fence grabber for the first time

 

To pull the fence tight requires the use of a fence puller. The puller is tied on to the grabber (which is temporarily screwed down onto the fence) and then itself wraps around the straining pole (right of picture below). The straining pole has extra (barbed) wire tied down to a large stone(s) buried in the ground. You can just see the barbed wire below top right.

George attaching the fence puller to the fence grabber

George attaching the fence puller to the fence grabber

As we learnt the hard way – the chain must not be twisted or else, sooner or later, the puller cannot grab any more links as they are twisted out of alignment compared to the jaws.

The chain must not be twisted!

The chain must not be twisted!

 

George happily inspecting the fence grabber

George happily inspecting the fence grabber

The whole lot is tightened using the jaws, one by one, to grab and slide over successive chain links. There is a lever coming off to left below which provides the manual driving force.

 

The fence puller jaws

The fence puller jaws

 

Manually helping the fence puller create that tension

Manually helping the fence puller create that tension

 

 

Helping the fence puller along

Helping the fence puller along

 

 

Fence held tight by the puller

Fence held tight by the puller

 

Hold the tensioned fence against each post

Hold the tensioned fence against each post

 

Nail the fence up everyone!

Nail the fence up everyone!

 

Nail it Garikai!

Nail it Garikai!

 

and repeat for 4.5 km

and repeat for 4.5 km

And if you must be tarred and feathered at least don’t do it to yourself ‘Hamletta’!

Tarred and feathered

Tarred and feathered

 

New litter of Jack Russell puppies

New litter of five Jack Russell puppies

 

New litter of Jack Russell puppies

New litter of Jack Russell puppies

And, finally, more of our home made poles ready to continue the fencing journey.

Our lovely poles

Our lovely home made poles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fencing Part 2: Produce your own poles and droppers

In clearing the fireguard area more completely this year we have been able to tackle a large area of Wattle trees and make our own fencing poles and droppers (narrower supporting poles).

The Wattle is a highly invasive foreign species i.e. a weed in Zimbabwe that is out of control. Seeds can stay dormant for 50-70 years so its not going away anytime soon. Based on the clearing of the fireguard last year I can see new saplings (from previous roots) growing to 2.5m high in a single year! That is no joke when it comes to trying to control the spread and growth of this tree.

Wattle trees on the boundary

Wattle trees on the boundary

Loading 3m droppers on the trailer

Loading 3m droppers on the trailer

Loading 3m droppers on the trailer

Loading 3m droppers on the trailer

Wattle droppers loaded up

Wattle droppers loaded up

Arriving at their temporary resting place  to be skinned

Arriving at their temporary resting place to be skinned by hand

Below right you can see the already de-barked poles left to dry in the sun.

Ramius and crew unload

Ramius and crew unload

Off they come

Off they come

Mid air wattle

Mid air wattle

Garikai with de-barked pole

Garikai with de-barked pole

Wattle pole before drying

Wattle pole before drying

Still very heavy as you can see

Still very heavy as you can see

Wattle poles after a month of so of drying in the sun

Wattle poles after a month or so of drying in the sun

OK lets end with a true local botanical – at least in the foreground (wattle and pine in the background of both pictures below – you see the challenge!)

Indigenous aloe in winter bloom

Indigenous aloe in winter bloom. Mufenge to left and right.

Aloe arborescens blooming on Hornbydale

Aloe arborescens blooming on Hornbydale